John Cage

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In homage to one of my biggest inspirations, John Cage on what would have been his 106th birthday (yesterday) here is one of my pieces from 2016 replicating his indeterminate processes from his Ryoanji series of prints. On art, Cage said; “Art is a way of life. It is for all the world like taking a bus, picking flowers, making love, sweeping the floor, getting bitten by a monkey, reading a book, etc…Art is not separate from life (nor is dish-washing when it is done in this spirit)”.

Phillip Guston

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In belated homage to Phillip Guston on his birthday, (27/6/1913) here is my piece from 2017, inspired by his zen Buddhist inspired ink work. On the nature of painting in the studio, Guston said; “when you’re in the studio painting, there are a lot of people in there with you – your teachers, friends, painters from history, critics… and one by one if you’re really painting, they walk out. And if you’re really painting YOU walk out”

Studio diary: 20/02

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Painting offers a way of working through an idea. Especially when working through a monochromatic palette without the distraction of colour. Even mindless painting without a clear agenda or goal insight will often generate something poignant or worthy of further exploration. 11th January 2017

I have long since admired Drawing’s immediate nature, Continue reading

M50 Collaboration: Joan Miro v Andy Warhol #3

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December 15th 2014: On my first visit to M50: Shanghai’s contemporary Art district, I spotted an intriguing developing collaboration. Moganshan Road, the main approach to M50 is home to a constantly evolving graffiti wall. The wall consists of layers upon layers of graffiti work that have built up over the years, sometimes with the work completely obliterating underlying layers, and sometimes consisting of integrated layers – resulting in intriguing collaborations. Continue reading

a few of my favourite things #4 : ‘wabi-sabi’

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Wabi-Sabi is an ancient Buddhist philosophy and principle of Japanese aesthetics centred around the ‘perfection’ in im-perfection and transience. The principle can be described as judging beauty in the ‘imperfect, impermanent and incomplete’. Characteristics of Wabi-Sabi can include; asymmetry, texture and tone, Continue reading