Research Observations: embrace the happy accident

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Observation and reflection:

One cannot over emphasise the importance of reflection upon creative practice. Like any muscle or skill, its important we take time to practice our skills of critical analysis and reflection, observation, and evaluation. Continue reading

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Studio Diary: 31/03

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Experiments and studies through Jackson Pollock’s ‘pour’ paintings.

Having stumbled once again upon Jackson Pollock’s late ‘pour’ paintings whilst preparing an Art History lecture in which I will discuss his later – evolved style, I was immediately struck once again with their immediacy, rawness and fluidity of mark. Continue reading

Studio Diary: 22/02

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The painting surface is a much more sparsely populated space with a more disciplined application of pigment. The tar-like black enamel paint (often applied using a turkey baster) pools onto, and bleeds into the un-primed canvas creating rich variations in texture and mark. Pollock’s wife, and fellow abstract painter Lee Krasner described these pieces as ‘painting with the immediacy of drawing… a new category’, a fitting analogy that closely captures the paintings direct and transient nature.
Painting with the immediacy of drawing: 15th March 2016

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Painting with the immediacy of drawing:

There are some interesting elements arising from the continuous exploration and development of the ‘synthesis studies’:
Continue reading

Studio diary: 20/02

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Painting offers a way of working through an idea. Especially when working through a monochromatic palette without the distraction of colour. Even mindless painting without a clear agenda or goal insight will often generate something poignant or worthy of further exploration. 11th January 2017

I have long since admired Drawing’s immediate nature, Continue reading

The Landscape Scrambler

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I have recently returned from China on my latest visit, where, amongst other things I completed another project with longtime collaborator the Three Legged Bird (a collaborative platform for experimental animation and film making) I have worked with the Three Legged Bird on a number of projects now, the most recent entitled ‘The Landscape Scrambler’. Continue reading

Research Observations: the power of the post-it

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13/01/2017: 16:37

  • We have to destroy in order to create.
    Birth and destruction are a part of life. In order to create we must first destroy.
    So often when trying to resolve a painting we must destroy the very element we like most about the piece.  In search of resolving a painting, one re-works and re-works the entire piece with the exception of our favourite part, resulting in an uneven composition. When our hand is forced to re-work our favourite element it is staggering just how quickly a piece can come together.
  • “We execute a skill best in the place wherein it was developed”.
    I read this quote a number of days ago and have found it never far from my consciousness ever since. Creeping back into my thoughts whenever I have an idle few moments.

    Environment

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    The context of the quote was discussing the associations formed between environment and the process of education. However upon reading it, I was transported back to an old studio I inhabited a number of years ago. I recall after reflecting on the paintings I’d created in the studio, I observed the pieces were immediate products of their environment, and possessed a’dialogue’ with the environment in which they were created. So much so, that to exhibit them out of their original context would mean loosing much of their meaning and relevance. For creatives especially, the environment one resides / creates in (both physically and mentally), is of paramount importance. It not only has the ability to enhance what we do, through the likes of ambient music for example, but also feed into and grow our chosen practice or discipline.
  • The power of the post-it.
    The sheer impact that a daily and weekly to-do list scrawled upon the humble post-it can have upon ones life is simply breathtaking.